The Wanderer

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southern-feminism:

I think cishet people get angry when they are labeled as cishet because they aren’t used to having to be labeled. They are shocked and upset that an increasing amount of people no longer refer to cishet people as “normal,” because those people have realized that no sexual orientation or gender identity is the supreme normal way to be.

(via feminist-fairy)

44,525 notes

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

(via lindseybluth)

(via dana-b)

577 notes

queertactics:

I have this headcanon that little queer kids at Hogwarts went to Remus when he was a professor because he ping’d the gaydar and they told him if they were being bullied and he made sure it got taken care of

I have this headcanon that he’d end up getting taps on his door at odd hours of the night because some kid got a howler from their parents and he made tea and let them cry about it somewhere safe where they knew they wouldn’t be judged

I have this headcanon that Professor Lupin was the teacher/adult-figure we all needed in our lives and that students sent him letters that summer he was sacked telling him how much he meant to them

I have a lot of headcanons involving Remus Lupin and yeah some of them are too hopeful but Harry Potter was my rock as a kid and it kept me going and I’ll be damned if I can’t imagine that happy things happen to people who deserve them

(via claudiaboleyn)

1,438 notes

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

(via sweetspeas)